How to Identify Stanley Hand Plane Age and Type (Type Study Tool)

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Stanley #45 – 7 forms of fun in 1! – And other combination/moulding planes

This came several years after the manufacture of Barber’s patent chuck and jaws, and two years after Amidon’s “Barber’s Improved” jaws made their appearance, empowering Millers Falls. Stanley didn’t have a chance, and wisely retreated from the brace business until they began buying brace companies in the early s. This history features the acquisition of the Bartholomew business in and then the Fray company in , leading to the development of an extensive line of braces that developed through the s and 30s.

ABOVE: Record No. T5 Technical Jack Plane. Welcome to Record Planes dotcom – The definitive resource for Record planes online. Here you will find a wealth of information, diagrams, statistics and photographs of all the planes, routers and spoke shaves originally marketed by C & J Hampton under the Record trade mark.

What I want to know is how to identify different hand planes to know what I have and if they have any special uses. Much like grfrazee discusses in his answer I’m afraid there isn’t a good comprehensive site for all of these, so you’ll have to do some research on your own for some of the lesser-known makers. So that way if you see a plane you can get an idea of its purpose and know whether or not you need it in your collection.

Again, this list is not meant to be extensive as there are many other types and some specialty types. The webpage Patrick’s Blood and Gore covers them more then we ever could in this format. Block These planes are smaller in size Not to be confused with finger planes which are even smaller and many can be worked with one hand. They specialize in end grain. Jack Hopefully it is safe to say that this would be one of the most common plane type you will run into.

The “Jack of all trades” plane is what you would picture when you think of a plane. Metal ones should have a knob and a tote handle and the body would hide the plane iron inside as supposed to something like a rabbet plane. Wooden one might not have a knob but would be about the same length. They are also shorter than a jointer plane but tend to be larger than the smoother. This is a general roughing plane.

Jointer These are some of the easier ones to spot as they are the family of long planes given there nature of true up panel faces and edges.

Woodworking stanley bench planes PDF Free Download

By Terry Hurley Collector and Antique Store Owner Take a look at more great antique hand tools Although identifying antique wood planes is often difficult for a novice collector, there are also times when a seasoned antique tool collector has the same difficulty. The Antique Wood Plane Collector Of all the antique hand tools made, the wood plane is one of the most highly sought after by tool collectors. They browse antique shops and online auction websites, search through the tools at thrift stores and rummage through boxes of old tools at garage sales and flea markets hoping to find a hidden treasure that would be a perfect addition to their growing tool collection.

Links to sites offering aviation photographs, images, and artwork.

The Universal Plane The Stanley Universal plane was introduced in and stayed in production until It was named the Universal plane as it was designed not only to do the symmetrical cuts of the Stanley 45 but also all the asymmetrical cuts of other complex moulding planes. When this tool was introduced most architectural mouldings were already bought pre-made from a lumber yard where they were machine made. The ’55 was designed to enable a carpenter in the field to duplicate a moulding for a repair or wherever a short amount of moulding was needed.

The tool was also a natural culmination is Stanley’s development of combination planes of ever increasing complexity and function. Advertisements of the time may have oversold its capabilities. Many of the functions it is supposed to be capable of are possible in theory but too cumbersome in practice, and if you start out with one of the fancy cuts illustrated in the manual like putting a beaded chamfer on a column you are likely to conclude that the plane is useless.

This overselling was probably a contributing factor in the plane having a reputation for being somewhat impractical. In particular, the fence faces are meant to pivot so that the same mouldings can be cut at different angles on a board. In practice, at least one of the plane’s skates has to regulate the depth of cut for the blade the same principle used in the Stanley 41,45,46 and This may be the reason the 55 has a fine adjustment mechanism on one of its fences; you start out with it fully extended and then work it in a bit each pass.

Again, we’ve never needed an angled moulding badly enough to find out, but it is interesting.

Standard Rule Co. – Some Planes and Info

A general description of stuff to look for when examining a bench plane is listed under the 3 smoother. This stuff is applicable to all Stanley bench planes, and comes from my observances of literally hundreds, if not thousands, of these planes. It never has a number cast on it, nor was it ever provided a lateral adjustment lever. The plane always has a solid brass nut for the iron’s depth adjustment. They are cute little planes that look sorta neat on a mantle, or on top of your TV, which is probably a better place for them than in your shop due to their value.

JUNE 9 ANTIQUES, ART & COLLECTIBLES SALE. SAT. June 9, AM/ Preview N. KAWARTHA COMMUNITY CENTRE. Mcfadden Rd. Apsley ON. ANTIQUES: decoy collection, antique tools to include saws, wooden block & finishing planes, press drill, logging saws, ice block tongs, railroad tie lifting tongs, grain scoop, pat. rope maker, hand-held scales, drawknife, tobacco .

Issue date April 26th June 28th, in Copenhagen. Note that Brandt was dovetailing the top or sides of the plane to the sole in a similar manner as the British and Scottish plane makers, such as those made by Norris or Spiers. Brandt was the first to introduce the adjustable mouth to this type of plane, but this a copy of an earlier model with a fixed mouth. In the mid s, Brandt pioneered the use of lever caps for the N. This was around the same time as Stuart Spiers in Ayr, Scotland and Fenn in London began installing lever caps as an option, replacing the bridge and captive wedge in their planes.

A miniature copy of a Brandt plane made by Dominic Micalizzi. Photo from Jim Bode. Photo by Jim Bode.

The Revised Stanley B&G – Bench Planes

Believe it or not, there is a way to make sense of all the different sizes and configurations of bench planes out there and to select the few that you need in your shop. Three Jobs for Three Planes You can tell a lot about what a plane is supposed to do by the length of its sole. The primary job of the smoothing plane is to prepare the wood for finishing.

It is typically the last plane to touch the wood.

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Antique Jewelers Work Bench or Cabinet For many of these collectors coming across an antique wood plane during one of their treasure hunts is exhilarating. Their minds fill with excitement as they wonder if the tool is a rare Stanley woodworking tool such as a Stanley No. If the plane is priced in the collector’s budget, the excited collector takes his special find home to research it and identify the antique tool’s rarity and value.

There are a vast number of antique wood planes in existence often causing confusion surrounding their identification. Often makers’ marks, company names or other identifying characteristics have worn away with time and use. Resources for Identifying Antique Wood Planes Excellent resources exist both on and off line to help tool collectors with antique plane identification.

Price Guides and Identification Manuals One of the most useful types of books for antique plane identification is a good price guide for antique tools. Price guides generally have excellent descriptions, pictures or drawings of the various wood planes in addition to the current retail price of the plane. There are price guides written expressly for wood planes. Other antique tool price guides have generalized sections on woodworking tools or a specific section on wood planes. Tool price guides from past years should not be overlooked as a valuable source of wood plane identification.

These price guides are often found at garage sales or online auctions at reasonable prices.

Antique Stanley Tools

It’s my first handplane and I’m really excited about it. It looks literally brand new and I’m almost positive it still had the factory edge on the iron and it was never used. It looks better than this 4.

Stanley Plane Identification: How to Identify Antique Stanley Bailey Hand Plane Age and Type? By Joshua T. Farnsworth. Below you will find a tool for Stanley plane identification, specifically dating Stanley planes and identifying the type of your Stanley Bailey woodworking bench hand planes.

Tuning a Stanley Bailey Bench Plane 1. Over years ago, when this plane was manufactured, Stanley was making woodworking planes in a variety of shapes and sizes for a multitude of different tasks. With some time and attention, this old tool will return to its former glory. The concept of tuning or fettling a plane is pretty straight forward. The sole mut be flat. The chipbreaker, blade, frog and frog reciever the part of the main casting on which the frog sits must all make as much contact with one another as possible.

Further more, the blade must be sharpened to a razor edge and shaped in an ideal manner for the tasks the plane will be expected to tackle. Taking all of this into account will allow a bench plane to do its job well with a minimal amount of physical exertion from the user. The Frog is the interface between the blade and the body main casting of the plane. The frog is also the part of the plane that allows for most adjustments:

My Hand Plane Collection. The years Stanley made them and the reason for the types